instagrarn asked: how much for your url

I’m going to ask my followers.  What do you guys think?  Eleventy billion dollars?

6 notes

vintageanchorbooks:

1. St. Louis, MO

2. Cincinnati, OH

3. Pittsburgh, PA

4. Atlanta, GA

5. Orlando, FL

6. Minneapolis, MN

7. Buffalo, NY

8. Denver, CO

9. Seattle, WA

10. San Francisco, CA

michael2h

656 notes

bethanysworld:

vanityfair:

May Vanities | Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany
Photograph by Miguel Reveriego. 

If you haven’t had a chance to check out BBCAmerica’s Orphan Black, I don’t know what to tell you… This woman is a phenomenal actress.  

Phenomenal is almost not enough.  What she does on that show is nothing short of breathtaking.  The most brilliant stuff occurs when she plays one character trying to act like another character (that she also plays) and she creates some sort of amorphous version of both characters.  Awesomesauce, Amazeballs, choose your favorite internet appropriate word of accolades - it all fits, and it’s only a start to describing her work.

bethanysworld:

vanityfair:

May Vanities | Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany

Photograph by Miguel Reveriego

If you haven’t had a chance to check out BBCAmerica’s Orphan Black, I don’t know what to tell you… This woman is a phenomenal actress.  

Phenomenal is almost not enough.  What she does on that show is nothing short of breathtaking.  The most brilliant stuff occurs when she plays one character trying to act like another character (that she also plays) and she creates some sort of amorphous version of both characters.  Awesomesauce, Amazeballs, choose your favorite internet appropriate word of accolades - it all fits, and it’s only a start to describing her work.

379 notes

pberntsen:

Online fandoms are now the popular media equivalent of the tech world’s early adopters. If you can get people to start blogging and tweeting about your TV show or movie, half the work is already done.

The good news is, your social media campaign doesn’t even need to be all that subtle. If you say that you’ll release the new Divergent trailer after a thousand retweets, a thousand fans will retweet you, cheerfully aware that they’re own Twitter feeds are being used for advertising purposes. Even fast food joints are trying to build their own fandoms, with Denny’s currently in the lead thanks to their inexplicably cool Tumblr presence.

Inevitably, there’s now a lucrative market for social media consultants who can engineer online fandoms from scratch, with the fans as willing participants in the deal. It’s an “if you build it, they will come,” kind of situation. Fans want to show support for their favorite TV show or movie, even if they’re completely aware that it’s a cynical marketing ploy. In the era of Facebook communication, you are what you Like.

In a recent episode of PBS documentary series Frontline, Douglas Rushkoff took a look at various social media fandoms from the ground up. With YouTube star Tyler Oakley at the most organic end of the popularity scale and the Hunger Games movies as the most professionally cultivated example, all of those fandoms had one thing in common: a desire to feel closer to your idols, even if the most tangible sign of that relationship is a retweet.

[READ MORE]

This is an incredible read for anyone in the media space. 

(Source: hellotailor)

546 notes

Little Boy: Mom, I don’t understand grown up jokes.

Mom: I don’t understand grown up jokes either.

Me: (to myself) Right there with you.

This adorable thing just happened in the Starbucks where I am currently working.  Cutest thing, and the Mom basically said what I was thinking at the exact moment I thought it.

heidi8:

pierogi-jarskie:

smithsonian:

Protip: This is a really bad question to ask when visiting the National Mall. We have 8 buildings surrounding the Mall, and a total of 19 museums, 9 research centers and the National Zoo. A S.H.I.E.L.D agent should know better! 

(We think she means the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in this case.)  

I love that this is on the Smithsonian’s tumblr

Whoever does social media for the Smithsonian is awesome. 

Funny, I had this very thought when I watched the scene the first time.  But we all knew what she meant.

(Source: runakvaed)

162,656 notes

Being precious is for rewrites. I can rewrite anything. Writing remains a motherfucker I must be tricked into doing at all costs and at all times.

2,092 notes

Did not know Elizabeth Banks was directing.  Good for her!

(Source: sendrick-faq)

1,696 notes

twistedtwinsproductions:

Wanna meet Jen and me? We are traveling around North America delivering horror and hugs (not necessarily in that order). Here’s what’s announced, there’s a couple others that we will be at and we’ll let you know:Rue Morgue Festival of Fear - National Horror Expo: April 18th-20th, Vancouver, BC (with Tristan Risk!!!!!)Texas Frightmare Weekend: May 2nd-4th, Dallas, TXCrypticon Seattle: May 23rd-25th, Seattle, WA (with Tristan Risk & Jessica Cameron!!!)DAYS OF THE DEAD: Indianapolis 2014: June 27th-29th, Indianopolis, INAnnual Calgary Horror-Con: August 2nd-3rd, Calgary, AB (with Jessica Cameron!!!)Flashback Weekend: August 8th-10th, Chicago, IL (with Katharine Isabelle!!!)Hope to see you there for the Canadian horror lady invasion of your cities~!

Tons of chances to meet two of the raddest ladies in horror film.

twistedtwinsproductions:

Wanna meet Jen and me? We are traveling around North America delivering horror and hugs (not necessarily in that order). Here’s what’s announced, there’s a couple others that we will be at and we’ll let you know:

Rue Morgue Festival of Fear - National Horror Expo: April 18th-20th, Vancouver, BC (with Tristan Risk!!!!!)

Texas Frightmare Weekend: May 2nd-4th, Dallas, TX

Crypticon Seattle: May 23rd-25th, Seattle, WA (with Tristan Risk & Jessica Cameron!!!)

DAYS OF THE DEAD: Indianapolis 2014: June 27th-29th, Indianopolis, IN

Annual Calgary Horror-Con: August 2nd-3rd, Calgary, AB (with Jessica Cameron!!!)

Flashback Weekend: August 8th-10th, Chicago, IL (with Katharine Isabelle!!!)

Hope to see you there for the Canadian horror lady invasion of your cities~!

Tons of chances to meet two of the raddest ladies in horror film.

23 notes

jenlammey asked: Hello, Mr. Hill. I was wondering how long you had been writing before you were confident your work was good enough to get published?

joehillsthrills:

When editors began sending me checks instead of rejection letters, I became 100% confident my work was good enough to get published.

Too funny/correct not to reblog.

48 notes

halleberiberi:

It’s like the episode of The Office when Dwight reads the children horrible stories.

(Source: fifthharmony)

5,320 notes

Bruck is one of the nicest guys I’ve had the pleasure to meet, and if anyone is going to get a found footage F13 movie right, it is him.  So thrilled for him to get a shot at this franchise!

28 notes

k-presently:

luciwithani:

I WANT TO BELIEVE. 

Is it still shipping if they are real people and not fictional characters?

k-presently:

luciwithani:

I WANT TO BELIEVE. 

Is it still shipping if they are real people and not fictional characters?

28 notes

nprfreshair:

Fresh Air’s TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new series  Fargo, based on the 1996 Coen Brothers cult classic. Here’s what he says: 

When the news arrives that FX has a new series called Fargo, the expectation is that it will be either a sequel to, or expansion of, that 18-year-old movie. And certainly, the previews have done nothing to discourage that.
But no. The TV version of Fargo tells a completely different story, with completely different characters. Only the snow remains the same. Yet based on the first four episodes, this new Fargo is a worthy companion piece to the film. The Coen brothers are on board as two of the executive producers, so they clearly approve – though that’s pretty much the extent of their involvement. Instead, FX’s Fargo is written and concocted by Noah Hawley, whose previous credits include working on Bones, and not much else. This is his step up to the major leagues – and in his first at-bat in the bigs, he swings hard, and hits a home run.
His Fargo – this first season, anyway – is envisioned as a stand-alone 10-part story. If it continues to a Season 2, it will be with a completely different plot, characters, and cast. That’s the way True Detective launched itself this season on HBO, and you know how brilliantly that turned out. By designing TV shows this way – longer and deeper than a feature film but not running for years – networks can get A-list movie talent to commit, and writers can craft stories with the end in sight from the start.
FX’s Fargo benefits from that, greatly.
Hear the full review HERE. 

 
image via FX 

I didn’t want to watch this, but I keep hearing good things.  The limited series aspect is really appealing.

nprfreshair:

Fresh Air’s TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new series  Fargo, based on the 1996 Coen Brothers cult classic. Here’s what he says: 

When the news arrives that FX has a new series called Fargo, the expectation is that it will be either a sequel to, or expansion of, that 18-year-old movie. And certainly, the previews have done nothing to discourage that.

But no. The TV version of Fargo tells a completely different story, with completely different characters. Only the snow remains the same. Yet based on the first four episodes, this new Fargo is a worthy companion piece to the film. The Coen brothers are on board as two of the executive producers, so they clearly approve – though that’s pretty much the extent of their involvement. Instead, FX’s Fargo is written and concocted by Noah Hawley, whose previous credits include working on Bones, and not much else. This is his step up to the major leagues – and in his first at-bat in the bigs, he swings hard, and hits a home run.

His Fargo – this first season, anyway – is envisioned as a stand-alone 10-part story. If it continues to a Season 2, it will be with a completely different plot, characters, and cast. That’s the way True Detective launched itself this season on HBO, and you know how brilliantly that turned out. By designing TV shows this way – longer and deeper than a feature film but not running for years – networks can get A-list movie talent to commit, and writers can craft stories with the end in sight from the start.

FX’s Fargo benefits from that, greatly.

Hear the full review HERE.

 

image via FX 

I didn’t want to watch this, but I keep hearing good things.  The limited series aspect is really appealing.

218 notes

These aren’t fans, they aren’t decent people, and they sure as hell aren’t real men.  If ever GDIAF had a need to exist, it’s for these people.

2 notes